Consulting Writer

I answer your questions about writing

795 notes

12 Tips For Writing Action Scenes

(Source: writing-tips-blog, via thewritingcafe)

Filed under writing advice action action scene fighting fight scene

2,441 notes

darlavillani:

Nine Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers
"Seeing your work in print for the first time is a unique thrill. But it can feel like a daunting task to submit your writing to a magazine or journal when you nobody other than friends and family has ever read it. To make the process somewhat less scary, here are 9 literary magazines that welcome submissions from new and never before published writers."
 Read on.
Let’s stay connected.

darlavillani:

Nine Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers

"Seeing your work in print for the first time is a unique thrill. But it can feel like a daunting task to submit your writing to a magazine or journal when you nobody other than friends and family has ever read it. To make the process somewhat less scary, here are 9 literary magazines that welcome submissions from new and never before published writers."

 Read on.

Let’s stay connected.

(via thewritingcafe)

Filed under writing opportunities

4,164 notes

lastrplord:

Say What?! - The Many Faces and Meanings of Said (Requested)
First, let me clear up a rumor. Said is not dead. Said is very much alive. It’s a clever little word with an awesome ability - it can become invisible. Of all of the books I’ve read - and I’ve read many - I’ve never been jolted out of the fictional world because someone said something. That being said, it’s sometimes nice to switch things up and use different words, especially to convey a certain mood. That’s where this guide comes in. I’ve grouped many said synonyms into moods, and within those moods I’ve ranked them by how much emotion they convey. Onwards!
The Scale - little emotion, medium emotion, big emotion
Happily

joked, lilted, giggled, exclaimed, laughed, rejoiced, sang out, jabbered

Sadly

groaned, snivelled, cried, mourned, blubbered, wept, bawled, agonized, lamented, sobbed

Angrily

asserted, retorted, ranted, snapped, growled, hissed, retorted, fumed, seethed, raged, thundered, roared, bellowed, snarled

Bossily

insisted, argued, bossed, dictated, professed, barked, yelled, demanded, ordered, shrieked

Pained

yelped, groaned, whimpered, cried out, howled, screamed, shrieked, wailed, bellowed, roared

Scared

squeaked, gasped, whimpered, stammered, screeched, shrieked

Understanding

consoled, comforted, sympathised, agreed

Begging

beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded

Arguing

grumbled, huffed, countered, argued, disagreed, retorted, agreed

Other Ways To Say It

quipped, raved, sputtered, squawked, asked, answered, explained, inquired, posed, pressed, called, pried, whispered, proposed, yammered, queried, interrogated, replied, breathed, croaked, requested, murmured, responded, retorted, suggested, prayed, purred, hollered, blurted, mumbled, sighed, complained, jeered

lastrplord:

Say What?! - The Many Faces and Meanings of Said (Requested)

First, let me clear up a rumor. Said is not dead. Said is very much alive. It’s a clever little word with an awesome ability - it can become invisible. Of all of the books I’ve read - and I’ve read many - I’ve never been jolted out of the fictional world because someone said something. That being said, it’s sometimes nice to switch things up and use different words, especially to convey a certain mood. That’s where this guide comes in. I’ve grouped many said synonyms into moods, and within those moods I’ve ranked them by how much emotion they convey. Onwards!

The Scale - little emotion, medium emotion, big emotion

Happily

joked, lilted, giggled, exclaimedlaughed, rejoiced, sang out, jabbered

Sadly

groaned, snivelled, cried, mourned, blubbered, wept, bawledagonized, lamented, sobbed

Angrily

asserted, retorted, ranted, snapped, growled, hissed, retorted, fumed, seethed, raged, thundered, roared, bellowed, snarled

Bossily

insisted, argued, bossed, dictated, professed, barked, yelled, demandedordered, shrieked

Pained

yelped, groaned, whimperedcried out, howled, screamed, shrieked, wailed, bellowed, roared

Scared

squeaked, gasped, whimpered, stammered, screeched, shrieked

Understanding

consoled, comforted, sympathised, agreed

Begging

beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded

Arguing

grumbled, huffed, countered, argued, disagreed, retorted, agreed

Other Ways To Say It

quipped, raved, sputtered, squawked, asked, answered, explained, inquired, posed, pressed, called, pried, whispered, proposed, yammered, queried, interrogated, replied, breathed, croaked, requested, murmured, responded, retorted, suggested, prayed, purred, hollered, blurted, mumbled, sighed, complained, jeered

(Source: ladyknightrps, via thewritingcafe)

Filed under language and linguistics synonyms say said

21,747 notes

thewritingcafe:

Symbolism

Birds symbolize freedom, power, messengers or carriers, transcendence, death, war, wisdom, life and death, and deities.
Blackbird - good omens, magic, shyness, insecurity, and enchantment.
Crow - guardian, carrier of souls, magic, trickery, thievery, cunning, boldness, eloquence, destiny, intelligence, swiftness, sacred law, and mysticism.
Dove - peace, purity, love, prophecy, gentleness, the Holy Spirit, and tranquility.
Eagle - swiftness, strength, courage, power, intelligence, wisdom, vision, healing, triumph, prosperity, and creation.
Goose - parenthood, luck, innocence, travels, fertility, productiveness, loyalty, teamwork, fellowship, communication, call of the quest, and cooperation.
Hawk - observance, guardianship, wisdom, illumination, truth, experience, creativity, nobility, messenger
Heron - good omens, self-reliance, and determination.
Hummingbird - messenger, joy, beauty, time, and swiftness.
Owl - silence, swiftness, keen sight, freedom, magical, watchfulness, patience, night, and intuition.
Peacock - birth, pride, spring, prestige, and resurrection. Peacock feathers were once thought to be evil because they resembled an eye.
Raven - healing, magic, divination, wisdom, eloquence, teaching, guidance, death, bad luck, shape shifting, and prophecy.
Robin - growth, joy, hope, happiness, good luck, and song.
Sparrow - intelligence, gentleness, companionship, hope, common nobility, and fertility. The sparrow is the bird of the full harvest moon.
Swan - emotions, sensitivity, dreams, true beauty, transformation, empathy, grace, innocence, balance, purity, union, and love.
Woodpecker - prophecy, magic, guardian of trees, and rhythm.

MYTHOLOGICAL BIRDS
Amihan
This bird is from Philippine mythology. It is said to be the first creature in the universe, making it part of a creation mythology. 
Adar Llwch Gwin
This is a large Welsh bird that know all languages and are loyal servants to their masters.
Alicanto
This bird belongs to Chilean mythology. Its wings shine and it brings luck to miners who see it. They emerge in the desert at night and act as light. However, this bird can also lead greedy miners to their deaths. It eats silver and gold, thus being a subject for miners to search for as the birds have these precious metals in their nests. It looks like a vulture, but it much larger.
Alkonost
From Russian folklore, this bird has the head of a woman and makes beautiful sounds. When its eggs hatch, a storm comes over the ocean. It sometimes has human arms. Hearing this bird’s song will make a person forget about everything else.
Ara and Irik
In East Indian mythology, Ara and Irik were two birds involved in a creation myth. They took two eggs from the water and made the sky and the earth with them.
Avalerion

Also known as alerion or the king of the birds

The avalerion is a mythological bird from Indian mythology. At any given time, only two of these birds exist. They lay a pair of eggs every sixty years, which take sixty days to hatch. After they hatch, the parents drown themselves. Other birds care for the newly hatched birds until they can fly.
In European heraldry, the avalerion is a heraldic eagle known as the king of the bird. Avalerions are depicted as having no beak and no legs, or sometimes feathery stumps.
It is said to resemble an eagle, but is larger, has sharp razor-like wings, and is the color of fire.
Benu

Also known as Bennu

Benu is from Egyptian mythology and modeled after the heron. The bird has two white feathers on either side of its head and wears either the crown of Osiris or of Ra.This bird often represents Ra (a sun god) because it is associated with the sun. Benu is a central part of creation mythologies. Benu is a symbol of rebirth.
Caladrius
This is a white bird that can sense death, as it refused to look at anyone who was dying. However, it can also take away the sickness from others and heal them. This bird is from Roman mythology.
Feng Huang
From Chinese mythology, this phoenix is highly respected and represents yin and yang. It has a swallow’s face, but a rooster’s beak and a snake’s neck. Some say the Feng Huang resembles a peacock. This bird is often paired with the dragon.
Firebird

Also known as Zhar-Ptitsa 

The appearance of the firebird is just as the name suggests: red, orange, yellow, and glowing. Most stories about the firebird include a hero on a quest to find the bird’s feathers. The firebird gives hope to those in need and it is said pearls drop from its beak. This bird has the ability to restore health. It is often seen sitting on a golden perch and eats golden apples.
Hoyl Bird
This bird comes from Jewish mythology and is immortal. Like a phoenix, it is destroyed in fire and then reborn as a full-grown hoyl bird in an egg. Its immortality was granted when Adam and Eve offered fruit to the animals. The hoyl bird was the only one that refused.
Huma

Also known as homa or the bird of paradise

The huma is a bird belonging to Persian mythology. This bird’s shadow is said to bring good luck to anyone who touches it (this detail varies). The huma is both male and female, dedicating a leg and wing to each gender. The huma flies incessantly and some say it has no legs.
The huma dies in fire and rises again in the ashes, just as a phoenix does. Some say eggs are laid in mid-air and hatched during the fall.
Kongamato
This bird has reptilian skin and comes from African mythology. This bird often dove from the sky and attacked passengers on boats to drown them. Looking into its eyes would anger the bird and guarantee death. It is said to be the size of an eagle.
Oozlum

Also known as Ouzelum

This bird is from British and Australian folklore. This bird flies backwards because while it does not know where it is going, it likes to know where it has been. This bird has colorful plumage and can be compared to an ostrich, but is smaller. Also like the ostrich, this bird buries its head when threatened, though not in sand.
Owlman
The owlman is an urban legend of Cornwall. He is an owl-like humanoid with red eyes who preys on young women. America’s mothman is its counterpart.
Roc

Also known as Rukh

This bird comes from Middle Eastern mythology. It was a massive bird similar to an eagle, though it had a forked tongue and sharp teeth. The size of the bird is said to be so large it can carry off an elephant.
SUPERSTITIONS & MYTHS
An owl that circles a house three times is said to be a sign that someone within the house will die soon.
It is said robins gained their red feathers because they attempted to remove the thorn crown from Jesus’s head, but his blood fell on the bird instead.
It is unlucky to kill a robin.
The eye on a peacock feather is said to be the “evil eye” and therefore bad luck to bring inside a home.
There are countless superstitions about birds near homes and windows that signify oncoming death.
Tip your hat at a magpie to avoid back luck.
It’s unlucky to kill sparrows because they carry the souls of the dead.
A crow at the window represents the soul of a dead person.
A nearby robin carries the soul of a deceased family member.

thewritingcafe:

Symbolism

Birds symbolize freedom, power, messengers or carriers, transcendence, death, war, wisdom, life and death, and deities.

Blackbird - good omens, magic, shyness, insecurity, and enchantment.

Crow - guardian, carrier of souls, magic, trickery, thievery, cunning, boldness, eloquence, destiny, intelligence, swiftness, sacred law, and mysticism.

Dove - peace, purity, love, prophecy, gentleness, the Holy Spirit, and tranquility.

Eagle - swiftness, strength, courage, power, intelligence, wisdom, vision, healing, triumph, prosperity, and creation.

Goose - parenthood, luck, innocence, travels, fertility, productiveness, loyalty, teamwork, fellowship, communication, call of the quest, and cooperation.

Hawk - observance, guardianship, wisdom, illumination, truth, experience, creativity, nobility, messenger

Heron - good omens, self-reliance, and determination.

Hummingbird - messenger, joy, beauty, time, and swiftness.

Owl - silence, swiftness, keen sight, freedom, magical, watchfulness, patience, night, and intuition.

Peacock - birth, pride, spring, prestige, and resurrection. Peacock feathers were once thought to be evil because they resembled an eye.

Raven - healing, magic, divination, wisdom, eloquence, teaching, guidance, death, bad luck, shape shifting, and prophecy.

Robin - growth, joy, hope, happiness, good luck, and song.

Sparrow - intelligence, gentleness, companionship, hope, common nobility, and fertility. The sparrow is the bird of the full harvest moon.

Swan - emotions, sensitivity, dreams, true beauty, transformation, empathy, grace, innocence, balance, purity, union, and love.

Woodpecker - prophecy, magic, guardian of trees, and rhythm.

MYTHOLOGICAL BIRDS

Amihan

This bird is from Philippine mythology. It is said to be the first creature in the universe, making it part of a creation mythology. 

Adar Llwch Gwin

This is a large Welsh bird that know all languages and are loyal servants to their masters.

Alicanto

This bird belongs to Chilean mythology. Its wings shine and it brings luck to miners who see it. They emerge in the desert at night and act as light. However, this bird can also lead greedy miners to their deaths. It eats silver and gold, thus being a subject for miners to search for as the birds have these precious metals in their nests. It looks like a vulture, but it much larger.

Alkonost

From Russian folklore, this bird has the head of a woman and makes beautiful sounds. When its eggs hatch, a storm comes over the ocean. It sometimes has human arms. Hearing this bird’s song will make a person forget about everything else.

Ara and Irik

In East Indian mythology, Ara and Irik were two birds involved in a creation myth. They took two eggs from the water and made the sky and the earth with them.

Avalerion

Also known as alerion or the king of the birds

The avalerion is a mythological bird from Indian mythology. At any given time, only two of these birds exist. They lay a pair of eggs every sixty years, which take sixty days to hatch. After they hatch, the parents drown themselves. Other birds care for the newly hatched birds until they can fly.

In European heraldry, the avalerion is a heraldic eagle known as the king of the bird. Avalerions are depicted as having no beak and no legs, or sometimes feathery stumps.

It is said to resemble an eagle, but is larger, has sharp razor-like wings, and is the color of fire.

Benu

Also known as Bennu

Benu is from Egyptian mythology and modeled after the heron. The bird has two white feathers on either side of its head and wears either the crown of Osiris or of Ra.This bird often represents Ra (a sun god) because it is associated with the sun. Benu is a central part of creation mythologies. Benu is a symbol of rebirth.

Caladrius

This is a white bird that can sense death, as it refused to look at anyone who was dying. However, it can also take away the sickness from others and heal them. This bird is from Roman mythology.

Feng Huang

From Chinese mythology, this phoenix is highly respected and represents yin and yang. It has a swallow’s face, but a rooster’s beak and a snake’s neck. Some say the Feng Huang resembles a peacock. This bird is often paired with the dragon.

Firebird

Also known as Zhar-Ptitsa 

The appearance of the firebird is just as the name suggests: red, orange, yellow, and glowing. Most stories about the firebird include a hero on a quest to find the bird’s feathers. The firebird gives hope to those in need and it is said pearls drop from its beak. This bird has the ability to restore health. It is often seen sitting on a golden perch and eats golden apples.

Hoyl Bird

This bird comes from Jewish mythology and is immortal. Like a phoenix, it is destroyed in fire and then reborn as a full-grown hoyl bird in an egg. Its immortality was granted when Adam and Eve offered fruit to the animals. The hoyl bird was the only one that refused.

Huma

Also known as homa or the bird of paradise

The huma is a bird belonging to Persian mythology. This bird’s shadow is said to bring good luck to anyone who touches it (this detail varies). The huma is both male and female, dedicating a leg and wing to each gender. The huma flies incessantly and some say it has no legs.

The huma dies in fire and rises again in the ashes, just as a phoenix does. Some say eggs are laid in mid-air and hatched during the fall.

Kongamato

This bird has reptilian skin and comes from African mythology. This bird often dove from the sky and attacked passengers on boats to drown them. Looking into its eyes would anger the bird and guarantee death. It is said to be the size of an eagle.

Oozlum

Also known as Ouzelum

This bird is from British and Australian folklore. This bird flies backwards because while it does not know where it is going, it likes to know where it has been. This bird has colorful plumage and can be compared to an ostrich, but is smaller. Also like the ostrich, this bird buries its head when threatened, though not in sand.

Owlman

The owlman is an urban legend of Cornwall. He is an owl-like humanoid with red eyes who preys on young women. America’s mothman is its counterpart.

Roc

Also known as Rukh

This bird comes from Middle Eastern mythology. It was a massive bird similar to an eagle, though it had a forked tongue and sharp teeth. The size of the bird is said to be so large it can carry off an elephant.

SUPERSTITIONS & MYTHS

  • An owl that circles a house three times is said to be a sign that someone within the house will die soon.
  • It is said robins gained their red feathers because they attempted to remove the thorn crown from Jesus’s head, but his blood fell on the bird instead.
  • It is unlucky to kill a robin.
  • The eye on a peacock feather is said to be the “evil eye” and therefore bad luck to bring inside a home.
  • There are countless superstitions about birds near homes and windows that signify oncoming death.
  • Tip your hat at a magpie to avoid back luck.
  • It’s unlucky to kill sparrows because they carry the souls of the dead.
  • A crow at the window represents the soul of a dead person.
  • A nearby robin carries the soul of a deceased family member.

(via everythingispoetry)

Filed under inspiration symbolism

3 notes

Writing an Author Bio

When people have finished reading your story, they might want to learn more about you. Depending on whether you are using a penname and how much you want to share about yourself your author biography could contain the following:

  • Your name (or penname)
  • Where you live
  • Whether you are married or have children
  • Maybe your book was inspired by a particular experience or you have something in common with the protagonists
  • Perhaps you have another career besides writing
  • Previous novels
  • Awards received and prizes one
  • Something extraordinary: Maybe you studied something really specially or travelled to very exotic places. Perhaps it’s something smaller, like a peculiar hobby.

 

Where to go for further information

You reader might want to learn more about your writing or keep up with future books your writer. So don’t forget to include:

  • Links to your homepage/blog
  • Social networks: Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, GoodReads etc.

If you don’t want to miss the next instalment in the Handbook to Self-publishing your own book series follow me on my writing advice TumblrTwitterGoodreads or Facebook so you won’t miss new instalments every Monday. 

Filed under self-publishing publishing writing writers on tumblr production Handbook to self-publishing your own book

1 note

What inspired TO BE A HERO

Recently, I was asked a question many writers encounter on a regular basis: How did you get the idea for your novel? Oftentimes writers don’t know where we get the inspiration from ourselves but here’s what I do know.

The novel is called To be a Hero. It’s about a girl called Valerie who has grown up reading stories about heroes, so that when a self-proclaimed hero in mask and costume shows up in her small town, she decides to become a hero herself.

As it already clear from the topic one of the main themes is heroes. This is a topic, which seems to be omnipresent in our media more than ever. Recently, immensely successful comic book adaptations of heroes have been made. Even the 2014 Academy Award Ceremony had heroes as its theme.   

My first decision was that I wanted a main character who is undoubtedly a nerd and identifies herself as one. Valerie grew up on legends of heroes like Odysseus and Beowulf. Of course she would also have read more recent literature about heroes but for copyright reasons I decided to focus on the older ones.

So now I had my main character. But most heroes aren’t alone. They have friends. What better foundation for a friendship, as many nerds will agree with me, than having an obsession in common. So I gave her friend, who actually dresses up like a superhero from comic books and strolls around the city, trying to perform good deeds. Naturally, both feel like outsiders in a rather judgemental little town and so they become friends. They also remain friends because it was important for me to make the point that just because the main characters are a male/female duo, they don’t have to end up getting their hearts broken in a tedious romantic subplot. Besides, as Valerie and Shadow agree, for most heroes in stories, their love life often ends in tragedy and death; unnecessary complications they can do without, considering they still have their normal lives, including stress of handing in their homework on time.

In the course of the story, Valerie and Shadow discover they have different views of what a hero is, views that also clash with the heroic images other characters in the novel have. They discover that the title of hero is very changeable and doesn’t always mean you have to save the whole world. Sometimes it’s enough to get over one of your own fears and do something nice for someone else.

All those different ideas of what a hero can be and how one can become one in a world where there are no evil empires to fight and where the hero is just an ordinary, teenaged girl leading a fairly average normal life. It especially appealed to me to not have Valerie be the chosen one but to struggle with being a hero because that’s the destiny she decided for herself.

Read more about To be a Hero

Filed under inspiration writing creative writing writers reading my life as a writer To Be a Hero