Consulting Writer

I answer your questions about writing

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amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:
1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

amandaonwriting:

The storytelling elements:

1. The Contract

In the very beginning, you have to make a promise. Will this be violent? Scary? Fun? Tense? Dramatic?

2. The Pull

Keep it light in the beginning. You don’t want to scare people away by being too dense — you must trust The Contract.

3. The Incident

This is the event that sets everything in motion. Should occur early and keep the story together.

4. The Reveal

Just before the Point Of No Return, the main character learns what the story is really about.

5. Point Of No Return

The forces of good are faced with an impossible decision that concerns fear, safety, love, hate, revenge or despair.

6. Mini-Climax

Sorry, but you must allow the the forces of evil to have an epic win.

7. All-Is-Lost Moment

The moment where all is lost. You must portray the deepest despair for the forces of good.

8. News Of Hope

This is the possibility for one of the side characters to shine. A light that shines into the total darkness of the moment.

9. Climax

The shit hits the fan and the good puts everything at stake and overcomes — despite impossible odds.

10. The End

Public displays of relief and happiness, love and forgiveness. It’s great! We also learn that the hero has evolved.

Article from Doktor Spinn written by Jerry Silfwer aka Doktor Spinn

(via writeworld)

Filed under plot structure plot structure plotting writing advice

4 notes

What is a book jacket and why does it bleed?

When you want to produce a printed book you will need more than just a cover, you need an entire book jacket. A book jacket consists of the cover, the spine and the back cover. Apart from having to design the spine and back cover, don’t forget they should include information on them as well.

Spine

  • Title
  • Author name

Back cover

  • Tag line
  • Blurb
  • Reviews
  • Awards you have won
  • ISBN and barcode
  • Link to your homepage etc.
  • Design credits

image

Everything outside the pink and purple lines is the bleed margin. There should also be additional bleed margin on both sides of the spine.

When you are designing these, you need to keep in mind that you need a bleed margin. A bleed margin is a certain amount of millimetres (how much depends on the thickness of your book and size of the paper, so make sure to check back with your printers) where the design continues. There shouldn’t be any writing or important parts of design inside the bleed margin, since it gets cut off during production.

If you don’t want to miss the next instalment in the Handbook to Self-publishing your own book series follow me on my writing advice TumblrTwitterGoodreads or Facebook so you won’t miss new instalments every Monday. 

Filed under self-publishing publishing writing writers on tumblr book jacket production Handbook to self-publishing your own book

27,499 notes

Here are three elements we often see in town names:

If a town ends in “-by”, it was originally a farmstead or a small village where some of the Viking invaders settled. The first part of the name sometimes referred to the person who owned the farm - Grimsby was “Grim’s village”. Derby was “a village where deer were found”. The word “by” still means “town” in Danish.

If a town ends in “-ing”, it tells us about the people who lived there. Reading means “The people of Reada”, in other words “Reada’s family or tribe”. We don’t know who Reada was, but his name means “red one”, so he probably had red hair.

If a town ends in “-caster” or “-chester”, it was originally a Roman fort or town. The word comes from a Latin words “castra”, meaning a camp or fortification. The first part of the name is usually the name of the locality where the fort was built. So Lancaster, for example, is “the Roman fort on the River Lune”.

A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 173. (via linguaphilioist)

(via thewritingcafe)

Filed under david crystal my favourite linguist language and linguistics

1 note

How does one become a hero?

This is a question which has always interested me? In literature we often have the trope of the Chosen One, whether it be Harry Potter or Buffy Summers. Here we have the reluctant hero who was chosen by a prophecy to fulfil a great destiny.

I wanted something different. Valerie’s tragedy in the beginning is that she loves stories about heroes so much she wishes that she was one herself and although she may not be athletic, she certainly has the knowhow for a variety of different ideal images of what a hero constitutes. But her tragedy lies in living in a completely ordinary, boring small town, where nothing ever happens. There’s no evil overlord to start a revolution against, no magical prophecy that foretold she would change the course of the future.

Therefore, Valerie isn’t chosen to be a hero by anyone other than herself. It is her deliberate decision to label herself a hero and try to realize the ideals of heroes she has. That is a very powerful decision I have found in my own life. Don’t be something because other people say you are (“chosen” to be that) or aren’t. Choose your own labels, with which you identify. For example, let’s say you’re a writer. It took me years to learn that I didn’t need anyone else to call me a writer to become one. I already was one, so when people asked me what do I do, I say, self-assured, “I’m a writer” and people accept that.

Being proud of the label you’ve chosen and telling people who you are can be an empowering experience. That’s another issue for Valerie. The first rule of being a secret hero is keeping your identity secret. The only confidant, apart from her partner in hero-ing, is her grandfather.

But this turns out to be less of a problem than she had anticipated. Valerie didn’t become a hero to gain admiration and praise for how selfless she is to help other people. She became a hero because being anonymous, thanks to the mask, allows her to do things she wouldn’t have found the courage to do otherwise. But still the reason, she become a hero in the first place was because it was purely her choice to stop waiting for other people’s validation and become a hero, showing that our choices do matter and define who we are.

 Read more about To be a Hero

Filed under hero superheroes super heroes heroes literature